Few Homemade Non-Toxic Cleaners to help with all your Household Cleaning (Part 5)

Continuing with our month old series of methods to make non toxic green cleaners with regular items in your own home to help you keep the planet clean and green.

  • Homemade Cleaning methods for Cast-Iron Cookware.

Compared to the widely used Teflon cookware, Cast-Iron cookware might be heavy, but they are durable and can last for generations.

Well that was the good bit about cast iron cookware, but it also has a downside too. Like how our beloved cast iron cookware demands unconditional love and care from us. It needs to be seasoned and protected from rust and what not.

So without any further adieu let us get on with it now shall we.

Fats and oils are mostly used to season cast iron. Our grandmothers usually recommended using rendered lard and tallow but now-a-days flaxseed and soy bean are considered to be a wonderful and at times the best alternatives.

You can always use Coconut oil as well, since it is such a healthier alternative but we do have a few other methods for you as well.

Seasoning Cast Iron Cookware

Now there are is a single method that we have on our hands but it comes with a couple of preparatory options that you can use to tackle this little bugger of a situation, so have a look.

The Preparation:

Optional Step #1: If the cookware you have bought has come pre-seasoned, then you better take a look at the type of oil that went into the process of seasoning. The one mostly used in such situations is GMO soybean oil. If you do not like the idea of your cookware being pre-seasoned then have a look below at the methods of what to do when cast-iron cookware is rusted and use it to get rid of the said oil.

Optional Step #2:  If your pan is slightly brownish consider bake it at 400-450F for atleast an hour or more prior to seasoning it.

This method is believed to help develop a layer of magnetite on the surface. Magnetite is an iron oxide which is seemingly thought to be protective against corrosion.

Overtime, cooking of different items on high heat on the cookware will make the cookware transition from brown to black.

The Method: 

  1. Rub cocnut oil or any other fat like tallow or lard on the inside and outside of the pan in question using a paper towel.
  2. Make sure to rub it thoroughly into every single nook and cranny.
  3. Then take another paper towel and wipe the pan until it looks completely dry.
  4. Place pan upside down in a cold oven. Although there shouldn’t be any drips, but just to be safe use a baking sheet or piece of foil to be place beneath it to catch any errand drips.
  5. Turn the oven on to 400 – 450F.
  6. When it reaches the desired temperature, set a timer for 1 hour and allow it to bake.
  7. When the hour is complete, turn off the oven but do not under any circumstances open the door.
  8. Allow the pan to cool for a couple of hours before removing.

Congratulations on seasoning your first ever cast iron pan .

Even after going through all this if you still feel as if the pan is still sort of sticking, repeat the process several more times. Add as many cycles as needed.

For further care use as many healthy fats as you can while cooking, since they help with the seasoning.

Cleaning Cast Iron Cookware

As you already know, or if you don’t then we are here to tell you, that you should never soak cast iron cookware along with any cleaning agent like soap or detergent as if may strip the surface or the said cookware.

The best way to clean it would be to use a stiff bristled brush along with some searing hot water and voila! There you have it, a freshly cleaned cast iron pan.

Removing Rust from Cast Iron Cookware

Cast iron is vulnerable to oxidation if not properly seasoned and activities like boiling water and cooking acidic foods like tomato can aid the oxidation process.

So, here is how to remove rust and restore the protective finish of cast iron cookware.

What to use…

  • Potato
  • Baking soda or salt
  • Coconut oil

The Method:

  1. Cut the potato in half.
  2. Dip the cut in baking soda.
  3. Rub over rusted surface.
  4. If the end of the potato becomes slippery to touch, cut it off at the tip and then re-dip in baking soda.
  5. Repeat until rust is completely removed.
  6. At last, immediately re-season the pan with coconut oil to prevent oxidation.
  • Homemade Laundry Spot Remover.

I have a problem. I am obsessively compulsive when it comes to cleaning and this habit of mine has not even spared my laundry habits. I never mix the lights with the darks and have always used good quality detergents. But ever since my tiny little one has turned into a fresh preschooler I have an additional task to deal with – Messy Spots!

Taking this problem in a stride I wiped up my very own cleaning method in a jiffy. Here is it for your aid as well.

What do you need:

  • Glass/Plastic spray bottle
  • 1 & a half cup of water
  • Quarter cup liquid vegetable glycerine
  • Quarter cup liquid castile soap
  • 5-10 drops of lemon essential oil

Instructions:

  1. Mix all ingredients together.
  2. Store the mixture in a glass container if you are using an essential oil because lemon can disintegrate plastics.

If you are not doing to use any essential oil, the mix can then be stored in a plastic bottle with spray nozzle up top.

  1. Shake well before use and apply it liberally to spots and stains.
  2. Lightly rub the mixture into the fabric with your fingertips.
  3. You’d get the best results in you let the fabric soak in water before tossing it into the washing machine.

Soaking overnight would yield way better results.

Notes:

  • If you are worried about discolouring the fabric in question, then test it first in an inconspicuous are before applying it to the spotted area.
  • Try to work the spot immediately or otherwise you might not get good results.
  • If you don’t have liquid castile soap, you can use liquid dish soap instead
  • DIY Homemade Laundry Stain Stick.

A laundry stick is the perfect way to pre-treat stains on the go, specially the stubborn ones like tea, coffee, lipstick, chocolate and wine.

Plus it is very easy to use as well, simply swipe it on and then toss the fabric in the washing machine to remove the stains.

What You’ll Need:

  • Quarter cup shredded castile soap bar
  • One-Third cup shredded Fels-Naptha soap bar
  • 1 tbsp vinegar
  • 1 tbsp washing soda
  • 2 tbsp water
  • Mixing spoon
  • Small saucepan
  • Grater
  • Lip gloss or mini deodorant containers
  • Scissors
  • Plastic bag

Directions:

  1. Shred and measure the Fels-Naptha and Castile soaps.
  2. Add to a small saucepan.
  3. Measure and add the washing soda, vinegar, and water.
  4. Stir over low heat until the mixture melts together and has a pudding texture.
  5. Turn off heat, and let cool for five minutes.
  6. Clean and dry the lip gloss or deodorant containers.
  7. While the stain stick mixture is still warm, spoon it into a plastic bag, and squeeze it into one corner.
  8. Snip the edge, and pipe into the lip gloss or deodorant container, tapping on your work surface to pack the stain stick into the small holders.
  9. Finish the tops by gently rubbing against the palm of your hand.
  10. Once the stick has cooled, top with the cap, and it’s ready to smooth on unwanted stains!
  • DIY Homemade Crayon Remover.

When it comes to a house filled with crayon loving teeny tots, seeing them create master pieces on the walls and random furniture is the greatest of worries mothers have to face. Now there is a really easy way to get rid to them. Read on to find out.

What you’ll need:

  • Lemon essential oil.
  • A soft cloth or rag.

Directions:

  1. Apply a few drops of essential oil to the rag or cloth.
  2. Scrub the place with crayon marks with the said cloth.
  3. Clean the area when done with a damp rag.

There you have it… All Done!

  • DIY Homemade Citrus Enzyme Cleaner.

Although bleaching clothes cleans them very easily, but using an enzyme based cleaner on them would make them even cleaner. Why? Because enzyme based cleaners can get rid of stains left by bodily fluids, like those pesky under arm stains.

Now the best news of all. Enzyme based cleaners can clean anything. And when I say anything I mean ANYTHING!

And, citrus enzyme cleaners is great because it’s:

  1. Natural
    2. Cheap since you are using up kitchen scraps
    3. Effective
    4. Easy to make

You can make it at home too… But it takes at least three months for the lemons to ferment. But still, it is a small price to pay for something so damn great.

What You’ll Need:

  • 2 Litre Wide Mouth Bottle 2 C or Enough citrus fruit peels to fit half the bottle. Oranges, Lemons, Lime,
  • 1 Litre of water
  • 1 Tsp of active yeast
  • 1 C Apple Cider Vinegar
  • 1/2 C Brown Sugar (or white sugar)
  • Strainer or cheese cloth
  • Funnel – to add brown sugar

Directions:

  1. Pick a bottle that has a wide mouth and make sure to follow the proportions in this recipe.

Do NOT double the recipe in this bottle.

  1. Take the scraps of citrus fruits like lemons, limes and oranges and chop them up into tiny pieces.
  2. Make sure that the pieces are small enough to be able to shoved through the opening of the bottle.
  3. Add water, sugar, yeast, and shake for about 30 seconds.
  4. Then, close the cap LOOSELY so the trapped air can escape and not build up in the bottle.

You’ll see the foam on the top in a day or two because of yeast fermentation.

  1. Shake the bottle daily for the first few days to mix the yeast and let out the air.
  2. After about 2 weeks, the enzyme will look opaque. Strain the pulp and the peel.
  3. Add apple cider vinegar to the liquid and store the liquid in a glass jar.

You can create an all-purpose cleaner spray bottle with 1:10 ratio to water and clean away to your heart’s content!

Or, you can use the concentration amounts that are appropriate for other cleaning uses.

So there you have it folks.

You can clean anything and everything in your house as long as you use our fore-mentioned tips, but if you can’t you always have the most reliable cleaners in London City (United Kingdom) to help you guys out.

Few Homemade Non-Toxic Cleaners to help with all your Household Cleaning (Part 4)

We did a lot of hard work and you, being the amazing people that you are applauded our efforts. For all your appreciation, we are eternally grateful to you.

Now, without further ado, let’s commence with our world-class homemade cleaner series.

All our old readers know what we are talking about, but our new ones are still a little baffled about what I am talking about. Well fret not, I will explain once again.

Most of the commercially available cleaners that are available in the stores contain harsh chemicals that contain some downright harmful chemicals that include skin and respiratory irritants and ecological contaminants.

And worse, there store bought cleaners are really EXPENSIVE!

Thus, as a step towards a healthy lifestyle and as an effort to save the planet we are here to provide you with a series of blogs each containing FIVE efficient and easy ways to make your very own homemade Cleaners that will not only aid in the cleaning process but also save you countless bucks during the process.

So without further adieu, let’s commence with the cleaning!

1. Homemade Granite Cleaner.

What are you going to need:

  • 1 Cup Water
  • 3 drops of dish soap
  • 1/4 cup of rubbing alcohol
  • You can use 5-10 drops of essential oils to mask the alcohol

Directions:

  1. Put the rubbing alcohol into a spray bottle.
  2. Add the dish soap, essential oil and water.
  3. Give it a little shake to combine.

2. Homemade Bathtub Scrub.

What are you going to need:

  • Half cup baking soda
  • 3 dozen eggshells to make about 3/4 cup of calcium powder
  • 15-20 drops of pure essential oil.

Directions:

  1. Rinse the eggshells well with plain tap water.
  2. Place 3-4 gallons of water in a large stockpot and bring to a boil.
  3. Reduce heat to a gentle simmer, then carefully lower the eggshells into the water and let them cook for 10-12 minutes.
  4. Remove the shells carefully and set them upside down on a baking sheet.
  5. Let them air dry for 8-12 hours, then place them in a 200° degree oven until they are completely bone dry, about 10 minutes.
  6. Working in batches, place the shells in a coffee grinder and process until they are completely powdered.
  7. Toss the finished calcium powder with the baking soda and essential oils and mix until the oils are well-distributed and no clumps exist.
  8. Spoon into a pint-sized Mason jar, then lay a piece of plastic wire mesh over the mouth. Screw on the regular lid to fit very tightly and store in a cool, dark place.

3. Homemade Oven Cleaner.

What are you going to need:

  • 1/2 c. vinegar
  • 1 c. boiling water
  • 1/8 c. dish soap
  • 1 Tbsp borax

 

Directions:

 

  1. Combine everything in a spray bottle and shake well.
  2. Sprinkle the inside of your oven with baking soda.
  3. Spray a thick layer of the oven cleaner all around your oven.
  4. Thicken the thick layer even further.
  5. Sprinkle with baking soda.
  6. Leave overnight.
  7. In the morning, scrub it all out with a hot wet rag.

4. Homemade Jewellery Cleaner.

What are you going to need:

  • Aluminium Foil
  • 1 cup warm water
  • 1 Tbsp Baking Soda
  • Pinch of Salt

 

Directions:

  1. Line a glass baking dish with aluminium foil.
  2. Place your sterling silver Jewellery pieces on the foil and cover it with a thin sprinkling of baking soda.
  3. Add boiling hot water to cover the jewellery.
  4. Use a wooden chopstick or other non-metal utensil to gently stir the items around a bit so they all have contact with the aluminium foil at one time or another.
  5. When satisfied, remove the items and rinse thoroughly under running water.
  6. When done pat items dry.

Precautions:

  • For more stubborn tarnish you can also assist the cleaning process by using a soft toothbrush during the rinse process.
  • Please be aware of not using this method to clean pieces that contain pearls, soft stones that have not been polished professionally like turquoise.
  • Never add ivory, opals, or any precious stone that may have enhancements or treatments such as wax or oils that are often used on sapphires, rubies, and emeralds!

5. Homemade Silver Cleaner.

What are you going to need:

  • 1 Teaspoon Salt
  • Aluminum Foil
  • 2 Tablespoons Baking Soda

 

Directions:

  1. Take a glass dish.
  2. Place your aluminium foil in this, shiny side up.
  3. Grab your silver items and place them in the bottom.
  4. Next, boil some water and then pour it over the silver.
  5. Make sure that you completely cover the items with water so that it all gets cleaned.
  6. Now put the baking soda and salt in.

The baking soda will actually cause the water to bubble and boil more so don’t be alarmed, that is what it does.

  1. Leave it like this for 30 minutes.
  2. When the time is up take a pair of tongs or anything to grab them with and wipe them down and dry them off.

So this is it for this week my lovelies….

You can always take our advice and get down and dirty or…

You can always hire the best cleaning services London City (United Kingdom) can offer.

 

Until the next time,

Stay GOLDEN!

Few Homemade Non-Toxic Cleaners to help with all your Household Cleaning (Part 3)

Most of the commercially available cleaners that are available in the stores contain harsh chemicals that contain some downright harmful chemicals that include skin and respiratory irritants and ecological contaminants.

These so called cleaners might be cleaning our space up but in the long run they are practically killing us like slow poison.

And worse, there store bought cleaners are really EXPENSIVE!

Thus, as a step towards a healthy lifestyle and as an effort to save the planet we are here to provide you with a series of blogs each containing FIVE efficient and easy ways to make your very own homemade Cleaners that will not only aid in the cleaning process but also save you countless bucks during the process.

So without further adieu, let’s commence with the cleaning!

 

  1. Homemade Bathtub Cleaner

Cleaning Bathtubs is hard work as it is let alone having to clean it almost every week. Well not to worry anymore. We are here to the rescue!

Ingredients

  • 3 dozen eggshells to make about 3/4 cup of calcium powder
  • 1/2 cup baking soda
  • 15-20 drops of your favourite pure essential oil – I recommend something citrus-y

Procedure

  • Rinse the eggshells well with plain tap water.
  • Meanwhile, place 3-4 gallons of water in a large stockpot and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to a gentle simmer, then carefully lower the eggshells into the water and let them cook for 10-12 minutes.
  • Remove the shells carefully and set them upside down on a baking sheet. Let them air dry for 8-12 hours, then place them in a 200° degree oven until they are completely bone dry, about 10 minutes.
  • Working in batches, place the shells in a coffee grinder and process until they are completely powdered.
  • Toss the finished calcium powder with the baking soda and essential oils and mix until the oils are well-distributed and no clumps exist.
  • Spoon into a pint-sized Mason jar, then lay a piece of plastic wire mesh over the mouth. Screw on the regular lid to fit very tightly and store in a cool, dark place. To use, merely remove the lid and rescrew on the ring to create a shaker. (You could also use a sprouting lid or anything else that strikes your fancy!)
  1. Frozen Citrus-Rosemary Garbage-Disposal Cleaning Cubes

The next time you’re enjoying an orange, hold onto the peels for this easy cleaning DIY. When your sink is wafting a bit of an unsavoury smell, you can quickly clean it with the help of that orange rind and some rosemary. And using vinegar naturally cleans your disposal. The little eco-cleaners basically cost nothing to make and put the rinds of your oranges, lemons, or limes to good use.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup citrus rinds
  • 2 tablespoons fresh or dried rosemary
  • Ice cube tray
  • Vinegar

Procedure

  1. Chop the citrus rinds along with the rosemary into a rough dice. You can use lemon, orange, or lime rinds for this DIY. Citrus peels are filled with natural antibacterial oils and also smell amazing. Rosemary is also naturally antibacterial and antifungal, making it a smart addition to this DIY. You can use fresh or dried, whichever you have on hand.
  2. Sprinkle the ice cube tray with the mixture, evenly distributing the peels and rosemary. Now fill with the vinegar, which is also a natural cleaner that refreshes dark and damp spaces. Place in the freezer until the cubes are frozen solid.
  3. Pop the cubes out of the tray, and place them in a glass jar or bowl in your freezer. The next time your garbage disposal isn’t smelling so great, toss one down the drain, turn on your disposal with water running, and enjoy the fresh scent! Extra bonus? The frozen cube also sharpens your disposal’s blades.
  1. DIY car upholstery cleaner

Mix together this quick and easy upholstery cleaner that you can stash in your car to use when needed. Made with your favorite dish soap and clean-boosting Borax, your seats will always look wonderfully fresh.

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons dish soap
  • 1 tablespoon Borax
  • 1 cup boiling water
  • Small mixing bowl
  • Funnel (optional)
  • Small spray bottle

Proedure

  1. Mix together the dish soap and Borax in a small bowl, and then cover with boiling water, stirring to distribute. Dish soap breaks up tough stains, and Borax is a natural cleaning booster that helps refresh and disinfect.
  2. Let the cleaner cool, and then pour it into a small spray bottle, using a funnel as needed. Do a quick spot check before using to make sure the cleaner doesn’t discolor your car seat fabric.
  3. The next time you’re dealing with a spill, spritz the cleaner onto a paper towel or soft cloth, and dab it onto the stain. Or use it full force with this complete car seat cleaning method!
  1. All natural upholstery cleaner

Let me just tell you that I have personally used this several times and the results were pure perfection every single time.

Ingredients

  • 2/3 cup of baking soda
  • 1/4 cup of white vinegar
  • 5 cups of warm water
  • 6 drops of lavender essential oil

Procedure

  1. Combine 2/3 cup of baking soda with 1/4 cup of white vinegar.
  2. Then add 5 cups of warm water and 6 drops of lavender essential oil.
  3. Stir until the baking soda dissolved.
  4. Pour it into a spray bottle.
  1. Homemade leather cleaner

Along with cleaning and organizing your home, keeping your leather furniture in great shape is a must once the weather starts getting warmer. Fresh spring air and hot summer sun can cause cracks and dryness in your favourite leather furnishings, which doesn’t make for a happy house. Instead of spending money on expensive cleaners and cleansers, make your own with ingredients you have in your kitchen. Free of any chemicals, this eco-friendly cleaner does an awesome job at refreshing all your leather furnishings. And did we mention that it costs basically nothing to make?

Ingredients

  • Paper towels
  • 1/4 cup vinegar
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 10 drops lemon or orange essential oil (optional)
  • Small bowl

Procedure

  1. Start by vacuuming your leather furniture, removing any bits of food and dust lurking about. Then gently wipe the leather item with a damp paper towel.
  1. Mix together the vinegar and olive oil in a small container, whisking to incorporate. The oil and vinegar won’t completely come together because the liquids have different densities. The vinegar gently cleans the leather, and the olive oil breaks up dirt and stains while conditioning the furniture. Adding essential oil gives the cleaner a nice scent, which leaves your furnishings smelling fresh.
  2. Dip a clean paper towel into the homemade cleaner and then gently rub on a small test area of the leather item. Let dry for 20 minutes and check for discoloration before coating furniture. Working in a circular motion, coat the entire piece, rubbing the cleaner into the leather. Use a clean and dry paper towel to gently wipe down the furniture, removing any remaining oil. Now sit back and enjoy your freshly cleaned leather!

So that is it for today folks….

I hope the DIY cleaners up-top help you out on the quest to keeping the planet green and your home toxins free…

And if that doesn’t work out for you, you always have us at Prudent Cleaning Services (London, UK) to help you out.

Stay tuned for more

&

Happy Cleaning…

Few Homemade Non-Toxic Cleaners to help with all your Household Cleaning (Part 2)

All it takes to live a healthier life is to take one baby step at a time, and choosing to use even just one non-toxic cleaner in your home is a simple way to live a healthier life.

Many of the cleaners available in most stores are harsh and include downright harmful ingredients, including skin and respiratory irritants, hormone disruptors, and/or ecological contaminants.

And worse, store-bought cleaners are expensive.

So let’s explore the DIY cleaner options we have for you now shall we?

  1. Homemade dusting spray and furniture polish

Thick and spray-able like store-bought dusting sprays, this polish dusts and protects wood all at once. We love it & here is the way as to how to make it!

You can make a simpler dusting spray with just olive oil and vinegar (and essential oils, if desired). See below for details.

Ingredients

  • ¾ cup water
  • 1 T olive oil
  • 2 T vodka (or white vinegar)
  • 2 T white vinegar
  • 1 T liquid glycerin (optional)
  • 30-40 drops essential oil (clove, orange, lemon, etc)
  • ¼ teaspoon xanthan gum
  • ½ teaspoon emulsifying wax, melted

Procedure

Place the water, olive oil, vodka, vinegar, glycerin, and essential oils in a blender and blend on high. While the motor is still running, add in the xanthan gum and emulsifying wax. Process for 10-15 seconds until slightly thickened.

Pour into a spritz bottle and use once a week.

Lasts up to 3 months.

 

Homemade Dusting Spray – Simplified Version

  • 3/4 cup olive oil
  • 1/4 cup white distilled vinegar
  • 30-40 drops essential oil, optional (clove, orange, lemon, etc)

Procedure

Place in a large spray bottle and shake vigorously. Spray directly on furniture (being careful of overspray) and buff with a clean, dry cloth.

 

  1. Homemade bleach for Laundry.

We all know what laundry bleach is supposed to do, but do we all know how toxic bleach really is? No!

Thus bleach is one of the few very important cleaners that require a green alternative ASAP. So here you go lovely readers and homemakers, the recipe to make your very own home-made bleach.

For laundry, you want something a little less potent – just so your colours actually stay, you know, coloured. If you do use the cleaning recipe for laundry, use only 1/4 cup and test on light coloured fabrics first!

The lemon juice is actually an important part of this recipe, so don’t skip it. The citric acid acts as a whitener, a very mild disinfectant, and as a water softener (thus allowing stains to be lifted out more easily).

Makes 1 quart

(multiply everything by 4 to make 1 gallon)

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup hydrogen peroxide (3% solution)
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice OR 1/2 teaspoon citric acid
  • 3 1/4 cups water
  • 5 drops lemon essential oil

Additional Note

Use 1 cup per load of laundry.

Results will definitely vary according to the hardness of your water.

  1. Homemade bleach for All-Cleaning Purposes.

For cleaning, you want oomph, and a 50-50 blend of 3% H2o2 and water seems pretty standard by the scientific community to sufficiently deal with common household bacteria, viruses, and mold. Of course, I always like things a little more potent, so sometimes I skip adding the water altogether. (Shhh… don’t tell. It’s not quite as frugal, but it makes me feel good). It makes 1 quart.

  • 2 cups hydrogen peroxide (3% solution)
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice OR 1/2 teaspoon citric acid
  • 2 cups water
  • 10 drops lemon essential oil

Procedure

Store in dark or covered bottles, as exposure to light will weaken the solution. Lasts up to 1 month in a clear bottle, 2-3 months in a dark bottle.

Here are a few ideas for keeping your solution in the dark:

Keep old peroxide bottles and kype a spray nozzle from another bottle.

Wrap the spray bottle in a brown paper lunch bag and secure at the top.

Cover the spray bottle with construction paper or wrapping paper and make it decorative – I’m not a crafty type, but those of you who are crafty at heart, feel free go to town!

  1. Homemade bleach for Disinfecting Surfaces & Washing Produce.

To make homemade bleach for this, keep two separate spray bottles on hand – one with standard 3% hydrogen peroxide and one with 5% or 7% white vinegar, then spritz them each on the surface to be cleaned – countertops, cutting boards, or fresh produce, for example – you will effectively kill any pathogens present. Because it weakens and loses its potency so quickly once mixed, there is no “recipe” for it beyond that, as you don’t want to mix it up ahead of time.

I personally like to spray a bit heavier with the hydrogen peroxide, as peracetic acid + hydrogen peroxide is even more potent disinfectant, but a 50-50 mix is certainly sufficient.

And of course, you’ll have the best results if you spray and let it sit to dry without wiping or rinsing.

  1. No-streak homemade glass cleaner

Knowing how to make a No-streak glass cleaner at home is itself a very cool feat if I don’t say so myself but what especially makes me chuckle about this recipe is the little science lesson at the end. Cool beans is right!

 

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup white vinegar (apple cider vinegar will work as well)
  • 1/4 cup isopropyl (rubbing) alcohol
  • 1 Tbsp cornstarch (the cornstarch reduces streaking — anyone know why?)
  • 2 cups water
  • 8-10 drops essential oil of choice (optional. Lemon, orange, or another citrus would be my choice here, but lavender or others would be nice as well.)

Procedure

  1. Combine everything in a spray bottle (You can reuse the container you already have from your store bought glass cleaner. I had to buy one at a dollar store since we haven’t used glass cleaner in years.
  2. Shake well to mix.
  3. Spray onto glass surface and wipe clean.

TIPS & NOTES:

– Shake well before using since the cornstarch might clog up your spray nozzle otherwise.

– Allergic to corn? I’m sure other starches like tapioca or arrowroot will work as well.

 

So that is it for today folks….

I hope the DIY cleaners up-top help you out on the quest to keeping the planet green and your home toxins free…

And if that doesn’t work out for you, you always have us at Prudent Cleaning Services (London, UK) to help you out.

Stay tuned for more

&

Happy Cleaning…

Household Items : To Repair or to Replace?

Want to know when your old furnace or washing machine is going to give out? Or when those old cabinets just can’t be saved? He we give you a decent guess estimate by compiling life-cycle data from scores of product manufacturers and testing labs along with if that particular item should be repaired or replaced to save your precious time and money.

Following is a summary to guide you in planning your next big home improvement.

 

  • Appliances

The life expectancy of a typical appliance depends to a great extent on the use it receives. Moreover, appliances are often replaced long before they are worn out because changes in styling, technology and consumer preferences make newer products more desirable.

Of the major appliances in a home, gas ranges have the longest life expectancy: 15 years.

Dryers and refrigerators last about 13 years.

Some of the appliances with the shortest lifespan are: compactors (6 years), dishwashers (9 years) and microwave ovens (9 years).

Repair or Replace?

If you want to upgrade your home, then as mentioned above, you’d more likely be replacing the item in question instead of repairing it for obvious reasons.

But in case any, if any of these appliances break down twice in the time span of six months or less, they should be replaced instead of throwing away money on repair.

  • Cabinetry and Storage

Kitchen cabinets are expected to last up to 50 years, medicine cabinets for 20+ years, and garage/laundry cabinets for 100+ years. Closet shelves are expected to last for a lifetime.

Repair or Replace?

Cabinets and storage units are pretty sturdy, thus if you face a tiny bit of a hickey with them like a loose door or shelf, repair it. But if they are coming apart after serving you for over, let’s say half a century, it is time to replace them buddy.

  • Concrete and Masonry

Masonry is one of the most durable components of a home. Chimneys, fireplaces, and brick veneers can last a lifetime, and brick walls have an average life expectancy of more than 100 years.

Repair or Replace?

As I mentioned earlier, they are pretty durable. Thus when the time comes consider replacing instead of repairing.

  • Countertops

Natural stone countertops, which are less expensive than a few years ago, are gaining in popularity and are expected to last a lifetime. Cultured marble countertops have a life expectancy of about 20 years.

Repair or Replace?

Natural stone countertops come will a lifetime warranty so you don’t even have to bat an eyelash about it once they are installed, you can just sit back and relax for the rest of your life.

Cultured marble countertops are far less durable thus when they cross the 30 years mark and start to give out, replace them.

  • Decks

Because they are subject to a wide range of conditions in different climates, the life expectancy of wooden decks can vary significantly. Under ideal conditions, they have a life expectancy of about 20 years.

Repair or Replace?

Decks suffer the savages of time and climatic changes far more than any other part of the house. Thus, consider giving it a hearty repair every couple of decades or so.

  • Doors

Exterior fibreglass, steel and wood doors will last as long as the house exists, while vinyl and screen doors have a life expectancy of 20 and 40 years, respectively. Closet doors are expected to last a lifetime, and French doors have an average life of 30 to 50 years.

Repair or Replace?

In my opinion and experience, doors have a way of lasting a lifetime unless termites start to feast on them from the inside that is when you are in trouble.

  • Electrical and Lighting

Copper plated wiring, copper clad aluminium, and bare copper wiring are expected to last a lifetime, whereas electrical accessories and lighting controls are expected to last 10+ years.

Repair or Replace?

Whenever you have electrical accessories or lighting control issues, your safe bet would be to replace it instantly instead of repairing and asking for a catastrophe to happen.

  • Faucets and Fixtures

Kitchen sinks made of modified acrylic will last 50 years, while kitchen faucets will work properly for about 15 years. The average life of bathroom shower enclosures is 50 years. Showerheads last a lifetime, while shower doors will last about 20 years. Bath cabinets and toilets have an unlimited lifespan, but the components inside the toilet tank do require some maintenance. Whirlpool tubs will function properly for 20 to 50 years, depending on use.

Repair or Replace?

To replace if broken or in bad shape : faucets and showerheads.

Repair if they breakdown a couple of decades after installation : Kitchen sinks, showers doors, bath cabinets, toilet tank.

  • Flooring

All natural wood floorings have a life expectancy of 100 years or more. Marble, slate, and granite are also expected to last for about 100 years, but can last less due to a lack of maintenance. Vinyl floors last up to 50 years, linoleum about 25 years, and carpet between 8 and 10 years (with appropriate maintenance and normal traffic).

Repair or Replace?

Flooring is the one thing that you cannot repair because the kind of damage it could suffers (like getting warped or termite/fungal damage) ends up asking for a replacement.

  • Footings and Foundations

Poured as well as concrete block footings and foundations last a lifetime, assuming they were properly built. Termite proofing of foundations will last about 12 years if the chemical barriers put in place during construction are left intact. Waterproofing with bituminous coating lasts 10 years, but if it cracks it is immediately damaged. Concrete or cast iron waste pipes are expected to last 100 years or more.

Repair or Replace?

Replace, not repair when needed.

  • Framing and Other Structural Systems

Framing and structural systems have extended longevities: poured-concrete systems, timber frame houses and structural insulated panels will all last a lifetime. Wall panels and roof and floor trusses will similarly last a lifetime. Softwood, hardboard, and plywood last an average of 30 years, while OSB and particleboard are expected to function properly for 60 years.

Repair or Replace?

This is one thing that cannot be replaced even if you want to replace it so it would be better to extensively repair it.

Garages

Garage door openers are expected to last 10 to 15 years, and light inserts for 20 years.

Repair or Replace?

Replace the lights when needed and a repair job along with a hearty dose of WD – 40 will do the trick for the garage door.

  • Home Technology

Home technology systems have various life expectancies. While a built-in audio system will last 20 years, security systems and heat/smoke detectors have life expectancies of 5 to 10 years. Wireless home networks and home automation systems are expected to work properly for more than 50 years.

Repair or Replace?

It is a bit of Hit & Miss over here. This is one area we cannot advice you what to do per say. You will be a better judge to figure out if a certain item needs to be replaced or repaired.

Just keep in mind that if the said item breaks down again a couple of weeks after being repaired, you need to replace it.

  • Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC)

Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems require proper and regular maintenance in order to work efficiently, but even in the best case scenarios most components of such systems only last 15 to 25 years. Furnaces on average last 15-20 years, heat pumps 16 years, and air conditioning units 10-15 years. Tank-less water heaters last more than 20 years, while an electric or gas water heater has a life expectancy of about 10 years. Thermostats usually are replaced before the end of their 35-year lifespan due to technological improvements.

Repair or Replace?

Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems are such household equipments that can serious but your house and your family at risk if not given proper care and maintenance. Thus such items such be kept an eye on and maintained regularly by a professional.

Plus if that particular professional asks it to be replaced, do so immediately.

  • Insulation and Infiltration Barriers

As long as they are not punctured, cut, or burned and are kept dry and away from UV rays, the cellulose, fibreglass, and foam used in insulation materials will last a lifetime. This is true whether the insulation was applied as loose fill, house wrap, or batts/rolls.

Repair or Replace?

Another household item that when needed should be extensively repaired instead of replacing.

  • Jobsite Equipment

Ladders are expected to last a lifetime, and life expectancy of lifts is about 8 to 10 years.

Repair or Replace?

Replace when needed.

  • Molding and Millwork

Custom millwork will last a lifetime, and all stairs—circular and spiral stairs, prebuilt stairs and attic stairs—are expected to last a lifetime.

Repair or Replace?

Needs a repair job from time to time.

  • Paint, Caulks and Adhesives

Both interior and exterior points can last for 15 years or longer, however home owners often paint more frequently.

Repair or Replace?

Replacement would be the best (and most probably the only) option here.

  • Panels

Hardboard panels and softwood panels are expected to last 30 years, while oriented strand board and particleboard have a life expectancy of 25-30 years. Wall panels are expected to last a lifetime.

Repair or Replace?

Repairing them would be a more economic option until they give out completely.

  • Roofing

The life of a roof depends on local weather conditions, proper building and design, material quality, and adequate maintenance. Slate, copper, and clay/concrete roofs have the longest life expectancy—over 50 years. Roofs made of asphalt shingles last for about 20 years while roofs made of fibre cement shingles have a life expectancy of about 25 years, and roofs made of wood shakes can be expected to last for about 30 years.

Repair or Replace?

Repair it when needed since replacing them altogether would be highly uneconomical.

  • Siding and Accessories

Outside materials typically last a lifetime. Brick, vinyl, engineered wood, stone (both natural and manufactured), and fibre cement will last as long the house exists. Exterior wood shutters are expected to last 20 years, depending on weather conditions. Gutters have a life expectancy of more than 50 years if made of copper and for 20 years if made of aluminium. Copper downspouts last 100 years or more, while aluminium ones will last 30 years.

Repair or Replace?

Replace when needed.

  • Site and Landscaping

Most landscaping elements have a life expectancy of 15 to 25 years. Sprinklers and valves last about 20 years, while underground PVC piping has a lifespan of 25 years. Polyvinyl fences are designed to last a lifetime, and asphalt driveways should last between 15 and 20 years.
Tennis courts can last a lifetime if recoated; most coatings last 12 to 15 years. The concrete shell of a swimming pool is expected to last over 25 years, but the interior plaster and tile have life expectancies of about 10 to 25 years.

Repair or Replace?

No replacement here mate.

  • Walls and Ceilings

Walls and ceilings last the full lifespan of the home.

Repair or Replace?

The most durable part of the house without which the house cannot exist per say. Thus needs proper upkeep and repair from time to time.

  • Windows and Skylights

Aluminium windows are expected to last between 15 and 20 years while wooden windows should last upwards of 30 years.

Repair or Replace?

Replace when damage through rust or molding otherwise repairing is fine.